1. Home
  2. Resources
  3. A Fair Start

A Fair Start

Author: Pippa Murray

A major new policy paper edited by experts in health and social care from the University of Birmingham and The Centre for Welfare Reform proposes radical reforms to the welfare system to get the best outcomes for disabled children and their families.

Families currently access support from a wide range of services including the NHS, social care, education and the tax and benefit system. The report argues that this array of systems means that most families are confused about what they are entitled to and professionals struggle to provide accurate and timely information about current services.

The author, Dr Pippa Murray, suggests that government departments need to work with communities and families to develop an integrated pathway for the care, support and education of disabled children. This Personalised Pathway will give families more autonomy in deciding the best care for their child and will also offer a more cost-effective method of providing social care to those who need it most.

Personalisation could include individual budgets and credits for families to spend on care or education.

Read and download the free pdf in your browser here.


The publisher is the Centre for Welfare Reform.

A Fair Start ¬© Pippa Murray 2010. 

All Rights Reserved. No part of this paper may be reproduced in any form without permission from the publisher except for the quotation of brief passages in reviews.

Documents

Contact

Pippa Murray PhD

ALSO SEE

Active Patient

Active Patient

Vidhya Alakeson's Policy Paper sets out the case for extending the principles of self-direction, and in particular the use of individual budgets, to many areas of health care.

Local Justice

Local Justice

Clare Hyde argues that the current criminal justice system is failing communities by drawing resources into damaging and inefficient systems.

Personalised Transition

Personalised Transition

An evaluation of a new and radical policy innovation in Sheffield which gives young people with disabilities and their families a totally new level of control over their life after school.